Vermont Medicaid (Global Commitment) (GC-21)

DEV: Developmental Screening in the 1st 3 Years of Life - Total Rate* (GC-21)

53.1%2021

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Notes on Methodology
  • The annual reported rate captures activity during the previous calendar year. 
  • This is a Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative (CAHMI) measure
  • There are no benchmarks available for this measure.
Story Behind the Curve

The percentage of children screened for risk of developmental, behavioral, and social delays using a standardized screening tool in the 12 months preceding their first, second or third birthday.

Developmental screening is a short test to tell if a child is learning basic skills when he or she should, or if there are delays.  The screener may ask the parent some questions or talk and play with the child to see how he or she plays, learns, speaks, behaves, and moves.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that all children be screened for developmental delays and disabilities during regular well-child doctor visits at 9 months, 18 months, and 24 or 30 months.  Additional screening might be needed if a child is at high risk for developmental problems due to preterm birth, low birthweight, or other reasons.

In the United States, about 13% of children 3 to 17 years of age have a developmental or behavioral disability such as autism, intellectual disability and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)  In addition, many children have delays in language or other areas that can affect school readiness. However, many children with developmental disabilities are not identified before age 10, by which time significant delays already might have occurred and opportunities for treatment might have been missed.

Last updated:  August 2021

Scorecard Result Container Indicator Measure Action Actual Value Target Value Tag S R I P PM A m/d/yy m/d/yyyy