Health Outcomes and 1 more...less...

G3O5. Decrease those struggling with substance abuse

Number of deaths related to opioid pain reliever per annum

1,8102020

Line Bar
Story Behind the Curve

Drug overdoses are the leading cause of injury deaths in the United States. More than six out of 10 drug deaths involve an opioid, primarily prescription pain relievers (morphine, oxycodone, hydrocodone) or heroin (1).

Prescription opioids are often used to treat chronic and acute pain and, when used appropriately, can be an important component of treatment. However, serious risks are associated with their use, and it is essential to carefully consider the risks of using prescription opioids alongside their benefits. These risks include misuse, opioid use disorder (addiction), overdoses, and death.

 

Death certificate data are used to track underlying and contributing causes of death, to understand the burden of drug overdose deaths for prevention. The underlying cause of death is the disease or injury that initiated the events leading to death while the contributing causes of death are diseases or injuries that contributed to the fatal outcome. Data are collected by the IDOH Division of Vital Records. A final dataset is provided by the IDOH, Office of Data and Analytics, and Data Analysis Team and analyzed by the Division of Trauma and Injury Prevention to identify overdose deaths among Indiana residents. Deaths are reported back to the county of residence of the Indiana decedent.

Drug overdose death counts involving opioid pain reliever (displayed above) include the following codes:

Underlying Cause of Death Codes (opioid Pain Reliever): 

  • X40 to X44 - Accidental poisoning by drugs
  • X60 to X64 - Intentional self-poisoning by drugs
  • X85 -  Assault by drug poisoning
  • Y10 to Y14 - Drug poisoning of undetermined intent

Contributing Cause of Death codes (Opioid Pain Reveilvers)

  • T40.2 - Natural and semisynthetic opioids
  •  T40.3 - Methadone
  •  T40.4  - Synthetic opioids

 

  1. American Health Rankings (AHR) - https://www.americashealthrankings.org/learn/case-studies/breaking-the-trend-partnership-to-address-opioid-abuse-in-america?utm_source=drugdeaths&utm_medium=website&utm_campaign=drugdeaths
What Works

Healthcare providers report concerns about opioid-related risks of addiction and overdose for their patients, as well as insufficient training in pain management. The 2016 CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain offers recommendations that may help to improve prescribing practices and ensure all patients receive safer, more effective pain treatment. Healthcare providers can also earn continuing education through this interactive training series called Applying the CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids.

Challenges

Prescription opioids are often used to treat chronic and acute pain and, when used appropriately, can be an important component of treatment. However taking prescription opioids for longer periods of time or in higher dosages can increase the risk of opioid use disorder (addiction), overdose, and death. It is also important for patients and providers to discuss the risks of opioids, consider alternative therapies, and, if prescribing opioids is appropriate, the provider should offer fewer prescriptions for fewer days and at lower dosages (1).

In 2017, there were still almost 58 opioid prescriptions written for every 100 Americans.

  • More than 17% of Americans had at least one opioid prescription filled, with an average of 3.4 opioid prescriptions dispensed per patient.
  • Per prescription, the average daily amount was more than 45.3 MME.
  • The average number of days per prescription continues to increase, with an average of 18 days in 2017 (2).

 

Healthcare providers report concerns about opioid-related risks of addiction and overdose for their patients, as well as insufficient training in pain management (1).

Sources 

  1. https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/deaths/prescription/practices.html
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2018 Annual Surveillance Report of Drug-Related Risks and Outcomes — United States. Surveillance Special Report 2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Published August 31, 2018.

 

Corrective Action
PoE

IDOH Overdose Prevention Records

Scorecard Result Container Indicator Measure Action Actual Value Target Value Tag S R I P PM A m/d/yy m/d/yyyy