Preventative Care and 1 more...less...

G3O4. Increase the use of primary care physicians

Decrease the percentage of individuals who have not received a routine checkup less than 2 years ago but more than a year ago

11.7%2020

Line Bar Comparison
Story Behind the Curve

A routine checkup is a general physical exam, not an exam for a specific injury, illness, or condition. 

The recommendations regarding the frequency of routine checkups are based on your age, risk factors, and current health status according to Healthline.

While opinions vary, routine checkups with your doctor are generally recommended as follows:

  • once every 3 years if you’re under the age of 50 and in good health
  • once a year once you turn 50

If you have a chronic disease, like diabetes or COPD for instance, you should see your doctor more frequently, no matter how old you are.

Your doctor may suggest more or less time between your checkups based on your risk factors, screening test results, and current health status. 

https://www.healthline.com/health/how-often-should-you-get-routine-checkups-at-the-doctor#how-often Last accessed 12 July 2022

Regular checkups with your healthcare provider can benefit your health in many ways. Some of the key benefits include:

  • finding potentially life threatening health issues early before they cause a problem
  • early treatment of health conditions, which increases the odds of a good outcome
  • regular monitoring of existing health issues, which lowers the risk of worsening symptoms or severe complications
  • staying up-to-date on vaccinations and screening tests
  • limiting extra healthcare costs associated with treating complicated or serious conditions that aren’t caught early
  • developing and maintaining an open, honest relationship with your primary care physician (PCP)
  • learning new ways to live a healthy, longer life and improving your health 

https://www.healthline.com/health/how-often-should-you-get-routine-checkups-at-the-doctor#how-often Last accessed 12 July 2022

What Works

Employers can play a critical part in helpinh their employees tp get anTools nual wellness-checks. According to Eden Healt, e,ployers can:

  1. Use internal communication channels. Promote Annual Medical Check-Up Day internally by sending a company-wide message of encouragement for employees to make time for their health.
  2. Add a block to internal calendars. Set aside a meeting-free hour for all employees and encourage them to use this time to book an appointment with their provider. Have them use the extra time after booking their appointment to build a healthy activity into their day, like going for a walk or taking the rest of the hour to meditate or eat a healthy lunch.
  3. Provide incentives.  Use the honor system! Have employees toss a quick “thumbs up” reaction to a Slack message to indicate that they’ve booked an appointment. Enter all “confirmed” employees into a giveaway, whether that’s a digital gift card or credit to your company swag store. 
  4. Protect PTO. If possible, be flexible when it comes to paid time off. Let employees know they won’t need to take PTO in order to accommodate their yearly physical. 
  5. Deliver better care to your employees. Access to primary care providers shouldn’t be limited to one visit a year. Providing next-generation hybrid healthcare solutions to your employees can help them be more proactive about their health. See how Eden can help form trusted relationships between your employees and our providers.

Source: https://www.edenhealth.com/blog/encourage-employees-schedule-physical/ Last accessed 12 July 2022

According to Chien, Chuang and Chen (Why People Do Not Attend Health Screenings: Factors That Influence Willingness to Participate in Health Screenings for Chronic Diseases), a convenient health screening site location, Cost (individuals do not have to pay for themselves), as well as sensitivity to human factors and diagnostic facilities (e.g., the sex, skills, attitudes, etc., of the healthcare professional who administers the screening) were important and influences people's willingness to participate in health screening services.

Source: Shih-Ying Chien,1,2,* Ming-Chuen Chuang,1 and I-Ping ChenWhy People Do Not Attend Health Screenings: Factors That Influence Willingness to Participate in Health Screenings for Chronic Diseases, National Library of Medicine, Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020 May; 17(10): 3495. Published online 2020 May 17. doi: 10.3390/ijerph17103495 (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7277138/) Last accessed 12 july 2022

 

Challenges

When people are feeling healthy, they are less likely to have a wellness screening.  The believe that health screenings were a waste of time, money, and other healthcare resources are also a challenge in motivating people to get regular health screenings. According to Chien, Chuang and Chen (Why People Do Not Attend Health Screenings: Factors That Influence Willingness to Participate in Health Screenings for Chronic Diseases), additional preventative factors included a belief that health screening service procedures were too complicated, and this was especially true for elderly people (who are more likely to have difficulty following instructions). Certain screening items were likely to cause negative feelings, such as distress. Chien, Chuang and Chen also reported that unexpectedly, some females reported that their husbands disapproved of health screenings, a preventative factor that was not identified other studies. The attitudes of health providers have an important influence over willingness of people to participate in health screenings.

 Source: Shih-Ying Chien,1,2,* Ming-Chuen Chuang,1 and I-Ping ChenWhy People Do Not Attend Health Screenings: Factors That Influence Willingness to Participate in Health Screenings for Chronic Diseases, National Library of Medicine, Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020 May; 17(10): 3495. Published online 2020 May 17. doi: 10.3390/ijerph17103495 (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7277138/) Last accessed 12 july 2022

Corrective Action
PoE

 

2020: https://www.in.gov/health/oda/data-analysis-and-risk-factors/behavioral-risk-factor-surveillance-system/ (2020: Indiana Core Questions Data Report, pg 26/275) (100%-(75.7%+11.7%)= 12.6%)  Last accessed 11 July 2022

2019: https://www.in.gov/health/oda/data-analysis-and-risk-factors/behavioral-risk-factor-surveillance-system/ (2019: Indiana Core Questions Data Report, pg 26/280))  (100%-(76.9%+10.2%)= 12.9%)  Last accessed 11 July 2022

2018: https://www.in.gov/health/oda/data-analysis-and-risk-factors/behavioral-risk-factor-surveillance-system/     100% - (77.0%+9.6%) = 13.4%   Last accessed 11 July 2022

2017: https://www.in.gov/health/reports/brfss/2017/C03.04.htm  Last accessed 11 July 2022

100% - (69.3%+12.8%) = 18.9% 

2016:  https://www.in.gov/health/oda/data-analysis-and-risk-factors/behavioral-risk-factor-surveillance-system/ (2020: Indiana Core Questions Data Report, pg 26/274)  (100%-(67.2%+12.6%) Last accessed 11 July 2022

 

Scorecard Result Container Indicator Measure Action Actual Value Target Value Tag S R I P PM A m/d/yy m/d/yyyy